The origin of Udupi hotel recipes

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Udupi cuisine is a world-renowned cuisine of South India.It forms an important part of the Cuisine of Karnataka and takes its name from Udupi, a town on the southwest coast of India in the state of Karnataka. The Udupi cuisine has its origin in the Ashta mathas of Udupi founded by Madhvacharya.

Udupi cuisine comprises dishes made primarily from grains, beans, vegetables, and fruits. The variety and range of dishes is wide, and a hallmark of the cuisine involves the use of locally available ingredients.

It adheres strictly to the vedic tradition of Indian vegetarian cuisine, using no onions or garlic, as well as no meat, fish, or shellfish. However, the cuisine may also be adapted for those who consume these restricted items. For a list of foods restricted for Vedic vegetarians, see shivalli. In order to follow tradition of chaaturmasa vrata, which is restriction of certain food ingredients in certain period or season may have led to innovation of variety of dishes in Udipi cuisine.Pumpkins and gourds are the main ingredients in sambar, a stew prepared with ground coconut and coconut oil as its base.

The ubiquitous Indian dish masala dosa has its origins in Udupi. Saaru, a spicy pepper water, is another essential part of the menu, and so are jackfruit, colocasia leaves, raw green bananas, mango pickle, red chillies, and salt. Adyes (dumplings), ajadinas (dry curries), and chutneys, including one made of the skin of the ridge gourd, are specialities.

The full course Udupi meal is served on a plantain leaf, which is traditionally kept on the ground. The dishes are served in a particular sequence, and each dish is placed on a particular spot of the plantain leaf. All the people eating this meal are expected to begin and end eating the meal together. A person cannot get up in middle of meal even though he has finished his meal. The start and end of meal is done by saying “Govinda,” the name of Lord Vishnu. A typical meal is served with the following (in sequence)

Salt
Pickle
Kosambari (seasoned salad made from split bengal gram or pea)
Bajji or chutney
Ajethna
Spiced rice (chitranna)
Appalla
Steamed rice (plain rice cooked in steam or boiling water)
Saaru and Rasam (a spicy watery soup)
Menaskai
Koddelu
Sweets like laddu, holige
Fried items like bonda, chakkuli, vada
Paramanna or Kheer (pudding) or Payasa
Buttermilk/curd

Depending upon the occasion, individual taste, and money, each dish may be made from different ingredients.

Categories : Blog,South indian cuisine

Indian spices

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Indian spices and benefits:

6 key spices—cumin seeds, coriander seeds, ground turmeric, mustard seeds, ground red chili and ginger.

Each of these essential spices has its own personality:

Cumin brings a toasty-warm flavor and is believed to aid digestion

Coriander is citrusy and adds texture to sauces

Turmeric has a slight bitterness and characteristic yellow color

Mustard seeds add a pungent flavor and a crunch to match

Red chili provides heat

Together, these spices create the flavor harmony and texture contrast that define traditional Indian curries. Best of all, some of them have been linked to health benefits. Researchers have suggested that turmeric could play a role in slowing down the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, while cumin has been praised not only as an iron source, but also for its potential, like mustard seeds, to prevent cancer and aid in digestion. Coriander has been used in India for its anti-inflammatory properties and studied in the United States for its possible connection to cholesterol reduction; the spice already is considered a good source of dietary fiber, iron, and magnesium. And chili has been associated with everything from pain relief, reduced congestion, and stomach ulcer prevention to weight loss and increased cardiovascular health.

Categories : Blog,Indian spices

Our Menu

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Click here for Menu

Click on the link above:

This is our list of menu items. Please take a look inside for a list of:

Appetizers, Soups, Dosa, House specialities. You can also print and save a copy.

 

 

Categories : Menu

Chole Bhature

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Chole Bhature

Bhatura is puffed deep fried bread and it is made from self raising flour.It is enjoyed with choley,in fact choley bhature is one of the most complete recipe that does not require any other dish to accompany. Channa Batura is generally served with fresh cut onions, green Chilli.

Categories : Menu,Today Special

Upma

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Upma

Up, Up Upma! Indian chef wins $100,000 prize in New York!

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2011-06-17/us-canada-news/29669637_1_indian-chef-floyd-cardoz-spices

Upma is sometimes derisively dismissed as “fertilizer” by snobbish foodies.

But in the hands of the New York’s celebrated chef, Mumbai-born Floyd Cardoz, the unpretentious upma shot into international culinary limelight on Wednesday. Asked to prepare an item based on food memories, (or dishes that inspired them in their lives), in the final of the much-watched Top Chef Masters contest in Los Angeles, Cardoz whipped up an upma of semolina and mushroom to beat two other favorites and win the top prize of $ 100,000.

But it was the personal food memories section that Cardoz upped the ante with upma, which critics loosely described a semolina pudding, or an Indian version of the Italian polenta.

“In the end, Cardoz impressed because of the spice and passion that infused his final meal of the season,” Wall Street Journal food critic Charles Passy said, “(He) won by doing exactly what he does at Tabla – that is, honoring his Indian gastronomic roots and finding a way to reinvent his native cuisine at the same time.” One of the judges, Saveur magazine editor James Oseland was quoted as saying, “You cooked a meal that was deeply skilled and very, very memorable.”

Categories : Menu

Masala Vada

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Masala Vada

Masala vada is one of the most popular snack. Composed of chana dal and spices, grounded and fried, held with the fingers, vadas are eaten like a snack or part of the main meal with much gusto.

Categories : Menu

Sada Rava Dosa

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Sada Rava Dosa

It is made with rava, especially Bombay rava or semolina, which doesn’t need fermentation and is usually considered a fast tiffin.

Categories : Menu

Pesarattu

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Pesarattu

Pesarattu (dosa) prepared with moong dal, is the signatory breakfast of our region(Andhra Pradesh) in India. Done to golden perfection, sprinkled with chopped onions inside, served traditionally with coconut, ginger chutneys and sambhar. Pesarattu upma combo.

Categories : Menu

Uttapam

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Uttapam

Uttapam or ooththappam is a dosa-like dish made by cooking ingredients in a batter. The batter is made of a 1:3 ratio of urad dal and rice (1:1 ratio of boiled to non-boiled rice) which has been fermented.[1] Instead of making it like a crisp crepe, uttapam is a thick pancake, with ingredients cooked right into the batter. Uttapam is traditionally made with tomatoes or an onion-chili mix; other common ingredient choices are coconut or mixed vegetables. Uttapam is sometimes called an Indian pizza or pancake.

Categories : Menu

Thali

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Thali

A thali is a selection of different dishes, usually served in small bowls on a round tray. The round tray is generally made with steel with multiple compartments. In North America, people sometimes use plastic thalis because they are disposable. Typical dishes include rice, dhal, vegetables, roti, papad, curd (yoghurt), small amounts of chutney or pickle, and a sweet dish to top it off.

Categories : Menu